Movie night: Black Panthers (Agnès Varda, 1968), Zéro de Conduite (Jean Vigo, 1933)

Sunday 22 April 2018, Movie night: Black Panthers (Agnès Varda, 1968), Zéro de Conduite (Jean Vigo, 1933).

Open 20:00 | Black Panthers 20:30 | Zéro de Conduite 21:15 (start times approx)

We’ll watch a perceptive short film (29 mins) about a Black Panthers Oakland demonstration, using Agnès Vardas own inimitable personal style, it also make a powerful political statement. Then we’ll have a short break, before something quite different. Back with our Story of Film theme, Vigo’s anarchic story of rebellion in an authoritarian French public school from the 1930s (44 mins). It inspired the much more violent rebellion in Lindsey Anderson’s If… This much earlier film still shocked Bourgeois French society enough that it was banned for over 10 years.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Far from Vietnam (1967)

Sunday 15 April 2018, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema.
Doors open at 20:00. Intro starts at 20:30 LOIN DU VIETNAM 1967 (Far from Vietnam) Directed by Joris Ivens, William Klein, Claude Lelouch, Chris Marker, Alain Resnais, Agnès Varda, Jean-Luc Godard. 120 minutes. In French with English subtitles.

In the late 60s there was a movement to make films collectively as a group. This idea took several forms, and in this one Chris Marker asked six directors to all make their own short film based on the anti-war movement against America’s tragic destruction of Vietnam. I was talking to someone recently who was saying they felt things were getting better because the internet is informing people better than before. Really? Then where the hell is the anti-war movement today?

This flick shoots us back to the 60s, when people were fighting for what they believed in. The demonstrations and solidarity created a constant charge of moral electricity, and it ricocheted through an entire generation. This new wave was both political and cultural. All seven directors who contributed to this movie have their own take… some are more fictional, others like Joris Ivens, are more documentary. Today the result is considered by many to be the best document of those foundation-rocking times. But back in the 60s, the reaction to this film was volatile… when the finished movie was first shown in Paris, it resulted in right-wingers vandalizing theaters and slashing seats. This was a bold project headed by Chris Marker, giving the public a vastly different picture of what was happening in Vietnam than the “official story” that was being reported by the mass media.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net