Other Cinema: Tongues Untied (Marlon Riggs, 1989)

Tongues_Untied_Marlon_RiggsSunday May 7th 2017, Other Cinema: Tongues Untied (Marlon Riggs, 1989). length: 54 mins. Doors 20:45, Film 21:00. Discussion afterwards

“Black men loving Black men is the revolutionary act”
Marlon Riggs’ essay film TONGUES UNTIED gives voice to communities of black gay men, presenting their cultures and perspectives on the world as they confront racism, homophobia and marginalization. It broke new artistic ground by mixing poetry (by Essex Hemphill and other artists), music, performance and Riggs’ autobiographical revelations. The film was embraced by black gay audiences for its authentic representation of style, and culture, as well its fierce response to oppression. It opened up opportunities for dialogue among and across communities. […Lees verder]

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Poison

170423_poison_smSunday 23rd April 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Poison (1991), directed by Todd Haynes. 86 minutes. In English. Doors open at 20.30. At 21.00, screening.

The feature debut movie of the now famous Todd Haynes (Safe, Carol, Velvet Goldmine). When Haynes made this project he was still an obscure filmmaker mostly known only in the gay community. But when an American Senator named Jessie Helms publicly attacked the film it made the headlines and the flick was suddenly catapulted into art house cinemas and even won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

Poison was inspired by the transgressive writings of the French author Jean Genet, who was both a criminal and a poet. The narrative structure is quite experimental, reflecting the wildness in Haynes’ later biopic about Bob Dylan I’m not There. So instead of having a single storyline, it has three narrative paths… ‘Hero,’ ‘Horror’ and ‘Homo’, and each is depicted in a different style – color, black & white, and documentary. For example, ‘Horror’ is modelled after an old-fashioned sci-fi melodrama from the 50s, and is about a scientist who is able to distill the human sex-drive into a single fluid. When things go out of control it unleashes a sexual plague across mankind, a clear reference to the aids epidemic.

The imagery is dynamic and bold, the music score is great, and the end result is absolutely unique. But this is a film for people who want to explore, rather than have a comfortable viewing. For example, it doesn’t make it easy for the audience to know how to react to many scenes. It can shift from moments of intense beauty to visceral queasiness… almost to a dizzying degree. It can be both enchanting and provocative. This is a small indie gem that is almost forgotten today, but which still packs a punch after all these years. […Lees verder]

“Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NODAPL Struggle”. Documentary and Discussion Night

NODAPLSunday 16th April 2017, “Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NODAPL Struggle”. Documentary and Discussion Night, 9pm.

Screening sub.Media’s first episode of Trouble, a brand-new monthly show offering an in-depth anarchist analysis of current struggles, tactics and movement dynamics. Trouble will broadcast first-hand accounts and perspectives from organizers on the ground, with the aim of cutting through the fog of misinformation that often clouds our understanding of the world, and provoking people into taking bold, collective action.

In “Killing the Black Snake: Behind the Scenes of the #NODAPL Struggle.” sub.Media looks beyond the mainstream narratives surrounding the Standing Rock encampment to get a better understanding of some of the camp’s overlooked dynamics, including serious disagreements over which tactics to use to best stop the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

sub.Media is an independent grassroots media collective and a video production ensemble aiming to promote anarchist and anti-capitalist ideas, and aid social struggles through the dissemination of radical films and videos. sub.Media: http://www.submedia.tv/

Other Cinema: Paris is Burning (Jenni Livingston ,1991)

ParisIsBurningSunday 9th April 2017, Other Cinema: Paris is Burning (1991) by Jenni Livingston. Doors 20:30, Film 21:00, we make popcorn ♥

Documentary filmed in the late 1980s, which chronicles the ball and voguing culture in New York City, involving African-American, Lationo, gay and transgender communities. The documentary is considered an invaluable exploration of New Yorks “Golden Age” and race, gender, class and sexuality in America.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open after 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Movie Night: Xiao Wu (The Pickpocket, Jia Zhangke, 1997)

The_PickpocketSunday 2nd April 2017, Xiao Wu (The Pickpocket) from Jia Zhangke, 1997. 111 minutes. Language: Mandarin/Jin Chinese. Subtitles:English. Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

Tonight we will screen the film Xiao Wu or Pickpocket, directed by Chinese director Jia Zhangke and starring only non-professional actors. The film plays in the 1990s, which is a transitional period in China away from communism and towards capitalism. The lead character, a pickpocket on the fringes of society, is struggling to cope with the rapid changes.

What’s so great about this film is that it perfectly and honestly captures the atmosphere of 1990s China, an era when many just overcame their hunger. This place was so poor and culturally remote that few took the effort to document anything. This time did however lay the basics for the current superpower of 1.3 billion. Even if only for that reason, this is a film worth to be seen!

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open after 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: The Woman from Rose Hill

170326_la_femme_de_rose_hill_smSunday March 26th 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema. Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

THE WOMAN FROM ROSE HILL 1989
(La femme de Rose Hill)
Directed by Alain Tanner

95 minutes
In French with English subtitles

The films of Swiss director Alain Tanner (La salamandre, Jonas will be 25…) are some of the most poignant and sharpest of the last century. Sadly his movies have been marginalized and trashed by our commercial film distribution industry.

Julie is a young woman from Rose Hill (Republic of Mauritius, an Island off the off the southeast coast of Africa). She moves to a little village in Switzerland, responding to a proposal of marriage by her pen-pal Marcel. But when Julie arrives, everything is wrong right from the start. Director Alain Tanner is excellent in showing the culture shock of this young black woman, confronted by the horror of Switzerland… cold, clinical, ordered, regulated, Calvinist, snow-covered, brutally practical and ultimately abstract.
In his films director Alain Tanner always focuses on outsiders, and here we see Julie as utterly dispossessed. Finally she meets Jean, a neighbor, and they have an affair, which leads to damning judgments from the local community. This is a tender movie, totally unknown, by a master filmmaker, dealing with issues of immigration and the responsibilities of Europe’s colonialist past. This will be an outrageously rare screening of this brilliant and haunting gem, that was effectively banned by commercial distributors. […Lees verder]

No More President’s: Trump Arrestees Benefit

natalie_keyssar_washington_dc_trump_inauguration_limoThursday 16 March 2017, No More President’s: Trump Arrestees Benefit. Volkseten Vegazulu at 7pm. Screening from 8:00pm till 10pm.

On 16 March 2017, there will be a benefit for people in the United States facing serious charges from the 20 January Trump inauguration protests. Over 200 people where arrested and many are facing felonies that carry a sentence of up to 10 years in jail. Global Uprisings (www.globaluprisings.org) will screen their short film “No More Presidents: Protesting the Trump Inauguration” along with video clips of other actions including airport blockades against the Muslim ban, the Berkeley anti-fascist action against Milo Yiannopoulos, the Day Without Immigrants protests, people preventing Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents from detaining undocumented migrants, and clips from the March 8 Women’s Strike. Following the presentation, there will be a Q and A about the situation in the US and how it relates to fighting the growing influence of the far-right in Europe. […Lees verder]

Black Cat Cine presents “The Square” (Jehane Noujaim, 2013)

The_Square_Jehane_NoujaimSunday 12th March 2017, Black Cat Cine presents “The Square” by Jehane Noujaim, Egypt 2013, 95 min, English subtitles. Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

An intimate observational documentary that tells the story of the struggle of the Egyptian Revolution through the eyes of six different protesters. Starting in the tents of Tahrir in the days leading up to the fall of Mubarak, we follow our characters on a life-changing journey through the euphoria of victory into the uncertainties and dangers of the current ‘transitional period’ under military rule. “An inspiring testament to the power of protests and the voice of the people.”

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open after 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Other Cinema: El Cadáver Exquisito (Victor Ruano, 2011)

Exquisite_CorpseSunday 5th March 2017, OTHER CINEMA: El cadáver exquisito / Exquisite Corpse (2011, 90min, USA/El Salvador, dir. Victor Ruano). Presented in Spanish with English subtitles. Doors 20:40, Film 21:00

El cadáver exquisito combines documentary, fiction and experimental film-making as it traverses the social and dream landscape of a region struggling between modernity and tradition. A peasant named Juventino, is killed during a fiery nighttime battle, dedicated to purify the city. As he leaves his world in the midst of this ritual he is infused with visions as his own mind attempts to filter and purify his fears and his desires. Juventino’s myths, as torrid and exuberant as the geography, are often more concrete than his reality. The inhabitants aid his journey by performing rituals with the hope of understanding, pleasing and obtaining favors from the beyond. During the day these rituals unleash repressed emotions, which at sundown are liberated into lascivious celebration. His corpse, during the autopsy, unveils something more repugnant than his death, the submission of the living to it. This fantastical collective biography immerses into a dense mythological universe by narrating the life of this being in the process of unbeing, this character becoming this corpse. […Lees verder]

Black Cat Cine presents “We Come As Friends”

20170226_wecomeasfriendsSunday February 26th 2017, Black Cat Cine presents “We Come As Friends” by Hubert Sauper, France/Austria, 2014, 110 minutes. English subtitles. Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

In his tiny homemade aircraft flown all the way from France, documentarian Hubert Sauper touches down on grassy strips and military airports in Sudan. He visits people and places in one of the world’s most politically confusing regions. “A modern odyssey, a dizzying, science fiction-like journey into the heart of Africa.” By the maker of Darwin’s Nightmare in 2005.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open at 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Movie night: Guerrilla: The Taking of Patty Hearst, aka “Neverland: The Rise and Fall of the Symbionese Liberation Army” (Robert Stone, 2004)

guerrillaSunday February 12th 2017, Movie night: Guerrilla: The Taking of Patty Hearst, aka “Neverland: The Rise and Fall of the Symbionese Liberation Army” (Robert Stone, 2004). Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

In 1974, a militant, fringe political group kidnapped teenage newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst from her Berkeley apartment. In the months that followed, Hearst, the Symbionese Liberation Army (S.L.A.), and their constant, paramilitary audio messages dominated headlines globally.
Using a treasure trove of archival footage and audio material, this film follows the bizarre saga from the establishment of the S.L.A., through the kidnapping, Hearst’s conversion to her captors’ cause, and the bank robberies and shootouts that followed.
First-ever interviews with two surviving members of the S.L.A. provide insight into the politically charged times and the reasons why the group embraced revolutionary rhetoric and a terrorist agenda. As the spectacle unfolds, and journalists camped outside the Hearst home become consumed by the story, the film begins to explore questions about the role of the media and the ethics of broadcast journalism.
Guerrilla: The Taking of Patty Hearst is an unprecedented account of the Symbionese Liberation Army, arguably the most notorious and flamboyant domestic terrorist group in American history.
Dedicated to the rights of black prisoners and the working class, the S.L.A. set forth in 1973 to incite the violent overthrow of the U.S. government, brilliantly manipulating the mass media to advance their message. Their audacious kidnapping of teenage newspaper heiress Patty Hearst inspired what might be described as the first true media “frenzy,” one that only exploded further when Patty transformed into “Tania” and joined the ranks of the S.L.A. Every detail of their descent into the surreal outer limits of political extremism was played out in public, a spectacle foreshadowing some of the worst excesses of modern TV journalism. Thirty years later, the S.L.A.’s extraordinary two-year crime spree resonates as a parable of political ideology run amok, the role of the media in America, and the romantic fantasies of modern political terrorism.
For Guerrilla, filmmaker Robert Stone went underground, where he spent four years creating a film that delivers both eye-popping archival footage and an exclusive interview with S.L.A. founder Russ Little, whose incarceration inspired the Hearst kidnapping. […Lees verder]

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Rome, Open City (Roberto Rossellini, 1945)

170205_roma_citta_aperta_smSunday February 5th 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema. Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

ROME, OPEN CITY. 1945
(Roma Città Aperta)
Directed by Roberto Rossellini
103 minutes
In Italian with English subtitles

Over the next months we will slowly take a look back at the brilliant early films of Roberto Rossellini, made when Europe was utterly ruined during WWII. When you watch these movies, you are watching two films at the same time… an incredible drama, and also a documentation of history shot in the middle of real-life.

The filming of Rossellini’s first neo-realist film, ROME, OPEN CITY was began when Italy was still occupied by the Germans. Made with almost no money, and shot in the streets of Rome guerrilla-style, this film depicts what the inhabitants of Italy were going though with a searing authenticity. Utter poverty, betrayal, humiliations, extraordinary renditions (I mean “kidnappings”) and enhanced interrogations (I mean “torture”) by the Gestapo. In this movie we get a heart-rending depiction of Europe torn to shreds by war.

The story of this movie (co-written with Federico Fellini) follows one of the leaders of the Resistance who is being hunted down by the Nazis. Shot on scavenged film stock with mostly non-professional actors, natural lighting, location shooting and little money… this is the kind of cinema that is only possible through sheer vision and passion. It was her performance in this film which would shoot actress Anna Magnani to international fame. Shot illegally when Italy was under fascism, this movie has gone on to become one of the classics of cinema.

This will be a high-definition screening.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open at 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Harlan County U.S.A. (Barbara Kopple, 1976)

harlancountyusaSunday January 22nd 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema. Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

HARLAN COUNTY .U.S.A.   1976
Directed by Barbara Kopple

103 minutes
In English with English subtitles

Here is a documentary that is generally considered to be the one of the very best ever made. It is riveting as hell, and was made in the old-school approach of cinéma vérité… in other words without any cheap pseudo-Hollywood effects or re-enactments, only raw material that was shot at the scene.

Director Barbara Kopple throws herself and her crew into the battle that was taking place in the small mining community of Harlan County, Kentucky located deep in the black mountains of Appalachia. This place had a history, it was also the site of the legendary “Harlan County War” in 1931, when miners fought against the brutal working conditions dictated by the local coal company.

In 1973 things flared up again when miners began to strike against the Duke Power Company. When you look at the footage, you have to conclude not much had improved in the last half-century. The situation was appalling, and this lead to a needed confrontation. The company hired goons to come in and break the strike up, and in one electrically charged scene at dawn while the strikers and camera crew are heading to the picket line, they are shot at with machine guns. Luckily Barbara Kopple keeps here camera rolling as we watch her and her cameraman Hart Perry attacked and beaten.

What a tear-jerker this one is, and I don’t mean in the sense of cheap sentimentalism. I mean in the sense of seeing people fight for their rights. The kind of spirit and fire that is documented in this film is something that is so lacking these days, and is something we need so much more of. People allow themselves to be pushed around, and while their rights are being stolen from them they do nothing out of fear of something worse. And that is what this film is about… not giving into fear.

And don’t get the wrong idea. This is not just a film about men. It is also about the wives of the miners and women who have lost their husbands in the mines. How fucking strong these women are, it’s amazing. It’s the kind of film that will cut you to the core. It also won the academy award for best documentary feature.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open at 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net