Black Cat Cine presents: “Bikes VS Cars” (Fredrik Gertten, 2015)


Bikes vs Cars from WG Film.

Sunday December 17th 2017, Black Cat Cine presents: “Bikes VS Cars” by Fredrik Gertten, Sweden 2015, 90 min, English subtitles, Film begins at 20:00.

If you are are bicycle owner in Amsterdam you could consider yourself pretty lucky with lots of bicycle paths and car drivers taking care (usually) not to hit you.
You would think all cities are becoming bike friendly but the powerful car-industry is lobbying for more roads and big parkings to accommodate the growing number of (electric) cars, at the expense of public space and the greenest way of transport: the bicycle. A look at what’s happening in some of the world’s big cities like Los Angeles, Sao Paulo and Copenhagen.

Doors open at 19:30, Film begins at 20:00!!! Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know.

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Missing (Costa-Gavras, 1982)

Sunday 12th November 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Missing. Doors open at 20.30. Intro + film start at 21.00. Missing – 1982 – Directed by Costa-Gavras. 122 minutes. In English.

They sure don’t make movies like this anymore. This was made in the day when bucking the system was still possible, and if you had some big name actors in your project you could make hard hitting flicks. This one stars Sissy Spacek (Carrie, Badlands) along with Jack Lemmon (Some Like it Hot) in one of his most important roles. It’s directed by the Greek filmmaker Costa-Gavras, and is based on the true story that happened in the 1970s. It follows the journey of a young American journalist who travels to Chile to cover a news story. While he is there, everything goes totally haywire, the country is thrown into turmoil, the government is overthrown and marshal law is declared. While the young boy is reporting the events, he suddenly goes missing. The movie mostly focuses on his wife and father who travel to Chile to try and find him back.

This is a thriller about having firm beliefs about the world, only to have them utterly shattered. Most of the film we spend with the father, a businessman who not only has to deal with a missing son, but also having his world view collapse as dark secrets are revealed. It’s devastating to follow him through a dark journey of dead ends – a maze of hospitals, morgues and police stations. The film is moody and suspenseful, and remains one of the director’s riveting masterpieces. The dreamy synthesizer music track was composed by Vangelis, and it’s considered to be one of his best. This is a movie that gives us some deep insights into history, and reflects a time when edgy movies could still be produced in Hollywood. The film has lost none of its power since it was made, and maybe has become even more relevant than before.

A highly-charged drama based on real events. Winner of the Palme d’Or at the Cannes film festival.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Other Cinema: Born in Flames

Sunday October 8th 2017, Other Cinema: Born in Flames by Lizzie Borden (1983), 90 minutes. Doors 20:45, Film 21:00. Discussion afterwards

The movie that rocked the foundations of the early Indie film world, this provocative, thrilling and still-relevant classic is a comic fantasy of female rebellion set in America ten years after the Second American Revolution. When Adelaide Norris, the black radical founder of the Woman’s Army, is mysteriously killed, a diverse coalition of women – across all lines of race, class, and sexual preference – emerges to blow the System apart.

(Description from Kanopy)

More information and critical review see here: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/richard-brody/the-front-row-born-in-flames

FREE SCREENING, POPCORN AND DISCUSSION

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: I was Nineteen (Konrad Wolf, 1968)

Sunday 1st October 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: I was Nineteen (Ich war neunzehn). Directed by Konrad Wolf. 1968, 115 minutes. In German with English subtitles. Doors open at 8.30, film starts 9pm. Free admission.

Here we dive into East German cinema, which in the 50s and 60s was often actually better than the movies peddled in West Germany! This one is a coming-of-age movie about a teenager in the chaotic insanity of the second world war. The narrative was put together from director Konrad Wolf’s own diaries and personal memories. This moody gem is a searing and intimate life story of a boy whose family left Germany for Russia when he was eight, and later finds himself confronted with the ironic situation of fighting his own people (the Germans) in World War II. We follow him as a young Russian soldier in a squadron that is making its way to Berlin in the final days of the war.

This is a masterpiece of East German cinema, which is not as much concerned with following the logic of war as it is with the weird situations that our main character encounters. There are moments that are chaotic, unpredictable, often senseless, bordering on the surreal, and you find dragged through one amazing, bizarre situation after another. It is a rough journey, sometimes even terrifying, but compared to its Hollywood/Spielberg counterparts this movie is devastatingly poetic and meditative. My god, what has happened to aspects like poetry and mood in movies? In any case, this film has them both still intact. Plus, it of course it offers us a very different view of history than what is depicted here in the West. The b&w cinematography is riveting and helps to create the meditative atmosphere of this beautifully crafted East German DEFA film.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open at 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Ace in the Hole (Billy Wilder, 1951)

Sunday 10 September 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: ACE IN THE HOLE, 1951. Directed by Billy Wilder. Black and White. 111 minutes. In English. Doors open at 8.30, film starts 9pm. Free admission.

This hard-hitting masterpiece is about the American way of turning any tragedy into a sensationalized media circus… complete with rides, cheese burgers and merchandise. It is about hyped-up media frenzies where only bad news, not good news, makes money. Just look at the news today: 95% tragedy, fear and threatening situations. This film is about the media’s ability to manipulate and control the public opinion.

Billy Wilder was a European director who is best known for creating some of the very best movies in the history of Hollywood, like the classic Some Like it Hot and The Apartment. This is an early effort by Wilder, and you can see his willingness to go against the grain, to tackle controversial themes, and to hold a mirror up to the American public and show what is really going on.

Despite the fact it was openly attacked by critics and the public, Ace In The Hole is right up there with Wilder’s best noirs (Sunset Boulevard and Double Indemnity). Our main protagonist, the opportunistic reporter Chuck Tatum (Kirk Douglas, who just turned one hundred years old!), gets a lead about a treasure hunter who is stuck in a cave. Tatum races there to exploit this event to the fullest… turning the poor man, who’s slowly running out of air, into an headline-grabbing attraction. He turns the situation into a sort of Disneyland of fake compassion, sentimentality and dull entertainment devoid of any moral concern. Understandably, American audiences were not amused by this cynical tone which revealed the nation’s obsession for sensationalistic tabloid-like news. Dark, cynical and straight… Wilder brings the story to the screen without pulling any punches, a visionary film that would leave it’s impact on later directors like Spike Lee and Oliver Stone.

This will be a high-definition screening.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open at 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

“HyperCoup. Rise of the Troll Nation”. Movie screening and discussion

“HyperCoup. Rise of the Troll Nation”
A dystopian sci-fi horror action documentary based on a real story.
70 minutes. 2017. Language: English, some parts Turkish; English subtitles

Movie screening on Friday 16 June 2017. Doors open at 7pm with food. Film starts at 8:30pm followed by a Q&A/discussion with the producers.

HyperCoup: Rise of the Troll Nation

What would you do if you could troll the entire world, while you get shit tons of money and an army at your disposal? What would you think if someone already did it? How could that be possible?

How has Turkey replaced the modern leviathan of state with a hypernormal troll state? How did in July 2016 a living dead army of trolls come to take over the streets of Turkey within their self-perpetuating panmedia environment? How was this troll army controlled by the government using a hypercentralized communication network? How did the Turkish state (which was portrayed as ‘moderate’ just a few years ago) come to dominate social media (which was portrayed as the ultimate liberatory medium just around the same years) and how deep does this go? How to make a coup and get away with it as if you fought and won against a “coup attempt”? How to conduct a political genocide while everyone is watching and still get to call yourself democratic? How did Turkey lead the way by example into the post-truth-trump world? How to survive the coming shitstorm?
… and hopefully much more with your participation in the virtual live interview with persons from the internet.

What the fuck is going on in Turkey?!

Looking for an overview of the situation and a critical media perspective, we asked this question last autumn.
We wanted to know what had happened since the so called military coup attempt. Soon it became clear that talking about this spectacle on July 15th 2016 only made sense in the bigger picture of Turkey’s political and social development within the last years; a development that we can now call the rise of the troll-nation state.
Starting from this point, our fellow ‘HyperNormalisation’-influenced media activists and cyborgs started retracing the story of the troll nation with the help of their own memories, experience and their best friend and external brain: the internet.

If you dare to know, what you will get is an explosion of footage, piecing together hundreds and thousands of documents and media particles which seem more or less random at first – but in their compilation and coming with a connecting story-telling, they outline the official state narrative with it’s overflow of media use and manipulation; as well as presenting many silenced voices, censored reports and the stories disrupting the official perception management.

Warning: some scenes are extremely disturbing and we assure you all of that really happened (it’s actually getting worse out there).

https://hypercoup.blackblogs.org/

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Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: From the Journals of Jean Seberg (Mark Rappaport, 1995)

Sunday 11 June 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: From the Journals of Jean Seberg. Doors open at 8.30pm, Programme starts at 9. FROM THE JOURNALS OF JEAN SEBERG, 1995 Directed by Mark Rappaport, 100 minutes, In English.

On Friday September 14, 1979 a group of mourners assembled in Paris’s Montparnasse Cemetery, including Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, decorating a casket with lilies, daises and yellow roses. This was the burial site of an extraordinary woman who was attractive, intelligent, famous and independent. A person who thought she was free, until she crossed the line and was put on the FBI hit-list. She was singled out, isolated, the victim of a smear campaign that destroyed her. The term for this is “character assassination” but it often leads to literal assassination.
Actress Jean Seberg, the American star of Jean-Luc Godard’s French New Wave hit Breathless, was a woman who was trying to do the right thing. She was married to the famous French author and diplomat Romain Gary, and both of them supported liberation causes in the 60s. In particular, Jean Seberg sided with the Black Panthers. This lead to a full attack against her by the FBI, who were out to destroy her at any cost. In the book Seances, I included a released FBI memo detailing their targeting of Jean Seberg as a subversive, and their intentions to ruin and “neutralize” her… including publishing fake news stories about her in the international press, such as Newsweek. This is no conspiracy theory, it is out in the open and a matter of fact.

‘Journals’ is a creative documentary that charts the life of Jean Seberg – from bright eyed actress who fought to be independent, to a woman doomed by a world of men. When Seberg was put on the government’s hit-list, she entered a dark world of undercover harassment, including burglaries, smear campaigns, wiretapping and stalking. Nico, the singer of the Velvet Underground, who was a friend of Seberg said “Jean was very beautiful and very intelligent, but she had a sad life … She pointed out the FBI men who were constantly following her around. Have you ever seen FBI men? They were exactly what you expect. Vulgar. Can you imagine such a thing? What tragedy…”

Narrated by Mary Beth Hurt (the star of Woody Allen’s Interiors), this is a piercing journey into the dreams of Jean Seberg, but also into the world of ruthless politics. A world where people who follow their heart are destroyed by men with dark agendas that wield their power. It’s that simple, and that tragic.

This will be a rare screening of this explosive documentary.

the trailer: https://www.fandor.com/films/from_the_journals_of_jean_seberg […Lees verder]

Ajami (Scandar Copti, Yaron Shani, 2009)

Sunday 4th June 2017, Movie night: Ajami (Scandar Copti, Yaron Shani, 2009). 120 minutes, Language: Arabic and Hebrew. English subtitles. Door opens at 8pm, film begins at 9pm. Free admission.

The film contains five story lines, each of which is presented in a non-chronological fashion. Some events are shown multiple times from varying perspectives. A young Israeli Arab boy, Nasri, who lives in the Ajami neighborhood of Jaffa, narrates the film.

The film borrows from the techniques of Gomorrah and the Mexican new wave as typified by, say, Amores Perros, in weaving characters and storylines to create a tapestry of lives. The drama is kickstarted by a drive-by shooting that kills an innocent boy, mistaken for one of the main characters. It’s the result of a vendetta between two crime clans and revenge for the shooting of a Bedouin weeks earlier.

Using non-professional actors, Ajami’s strands give an unusually nuanced insight to life in Israel, its confusion of identities and passions. Intelligently, the directors offer no glib solutions or sermons and allow the considerable energy of its images to sweep viewers along. Age-old prejudices and hatreds surface every now and then, but the main aim is the politics of day-to-day survival.

Movie trailer: https://vimeo.com/15503260 […Lees verder]

Screening: The Strange World of Gurney Slade (1960)

gslade1Sunday 28th May 2017, Screening: The Strange World of Gurney Slade (1960). Written by Sid Green and Dick Hills.. We’ll be screening three episodes at 9pm.

The bizarre adventures of a frustrated actor, who walks off a tired family sitcom into a world of talking dogs, and dancing advertisements. One of television’s genuine oddities, The Strange World of Gurney Slade was a whimsical ‘comedy of thought’ following one ex- (or so he thinks) actor’s meandering journey through a fantasy world. On the back of a burgeoning pop career, Anthony Newley was offered free reign to create of a six-part comedy series in collaboration with comedy scriptwriters Sid Green and Dick Hills (who would later write for Morecambe and Wise). The result, to the bemusement of ATV’s Lew Grade, was not a series of pop shows, but an off-beat, stream-of-consciousness comedy.

Unusually, the series was shot on film, marking it out from the largely studio-bound, live, theatrical drama of its time. The first episode sees actor Gurney Slade, in protest against a hackneyed sitcom script, abandoning the studio set for the streets of London. What follows is a fantastical journey unlike anything on television by 1960: Lewis Carroll-style linguistic invention, conversations with dustbins and dances with Hoovers, culminating in Gurney’s entering a home to find an average TV viewing family (his former acting colleagues) watching his show. […Lees verder]

“Cinema Perpetuum Mobile” Short Films

1 lomi lomi_3Thursday 25th May 2017, “Cinema Perpetuum Mobile” Short Films. Volkseten Vegazulu, 7pm. Short films from 9pm.

Cinema Perpetuum Mobile (CPM) is an annual international short film festival. Founded in 2011 in Minsk (Belarus) by a cinephile community Kinaklub.org. CPM sticks to its goals:
– promoting films by young and independent Belarusian authors in Belarus and internationally
– searching for new forms and tendencies in cinema on the edge of amateur and professional film-making;
– exploring social issues via cinematographic language
– develop and strengthen connections between film-makers and film-making communities all around the world

Cinema Perpetuum Mobile reaches the audience not only in Belarusian regions and cities, but in other countries as well. It is you who help us bring independent cinema to more and more people, and our community is growing due to the principles we incorporate in our mission: decentralization (horizontal structure of the festival), self-organization (volunteer basis, grassroot initiative), transparency (possibility to join the community at any time, and contribute to festival organization).

At the 6th festival of Cinema Perpetuum Mobile will show 12 programs of short films from around the world. The main Belarusian program includes 3 documentary and 6 gaming works created by young independent authors over the past year. In addition to the traditional genre competition sections (game, documentary, experimental cinema, animation), the organizers prepared two sets of works at the junction of various types of art: multimedia, social networks, video blogging and computer technologies.

For the second time at the festival there will be a Visual Music show devoted to audiovisual works from around the world. This year the organizers decided to experiment and collected a selection of Belarusian works synthesizing video, photography, blogging and clip culture and performance.

Cinema Perpetuum Mobile: http://filmfest.by/en/ […Lees verder]

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Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: El Pico (Eloy de la Iglesia, 1983)

170514_el_pico_smSunday May 14th 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema. El Pico (1983) by Eloy de la Iglesia. 105 minutes. In Spanish and Basque, with custom-made English subtitles. Door opens at 8pm, film begin at 9pm. Free admission.

This is the key movie of a much discussed genre called /cine quinqui/, which dealt mostly with heroin-use and small-time criminality.  While Europe seemingly only produced a handful of heroin dramas like Christiane F., in Spain the genre caught on like wildfire. Most of the films were low budget, rough and gritty in a wonderful Blaxploitation kind of way.

El pico is the culmination of the quinqui movement, but it is also much more than that. No longer a low-budget affair, this movie is a full-fledged political thriller set in the Basque country. At the time, Eloy de la Iglesia’s denunciation of the Guardia Civil’s involvement in the heroin trade sounded like a crazy conspiracy theory. It would take another fifteen years for the Supreme Court to endorse the accusations made in this movie (Caso UCIFA, 1997). Much like the CIA’s involvement in the Cointelpro heroin deals to hush down, frame or kill the ‘black power’ communities, the Guardia Civil worked hand in hand with drugdealers to stifle a rebellious unemployed Basque youth, who were still joining the ranks of ETA and nationalist parties.

If this wasn’t enough, El pico is also a film about homosexual emancipation. Quique San Francisco plays a brave, politically engaged, deeply humane gay character, and in the role of the beautiful young junkie we find Eloy de la Iglesia’s long-time lover Jose Luis Manzano, one of the many heroin celebrities of the time. As a teenager, Manzano had tried to mug the film director, but ended up starring in several of his films. Like many cine quinqui stars, the talented non-actor spent his life going from rehab to filmshoot to court-hearing, and he died of a bad heroin dose just a decade after this movie was shot.

The movie was a massive box-office success, despite the horrendous reviews by film critics in Spain. it was soon followed up with El pico 2, which presented drug use in a slightly more realistic way.

Film night at Joe’s Garage, cozy cinema! Doors open at 8pm, film begins at 9pm, free entrance. You want to play a movie, let us know: joe [at] squat [dot] net

[…Lees verder]

Other Cinema: Tongues Untied (Marlon Riggs, 1989)

Tongues_Untied_Marlon_RiggsSunday May 7th 2017, Other Cinema: Tongues Untied (Marlon Riggs, 1989). length: 54 mins. Doors 20:45, Film 21:00. Discussion afterwards

“Black men loving Black men is the revolutionary act”
Marlon Riggs’ essay film TONGUES UNTIED gives voice to communities of black gay men, presenting their cultures and perspectives on the world as they confront racism, homophobia and marginalization. It broke new artistic ground by mixing poetry (by Essex Hemphill and other artists), music, performance and Riggs’ autobiographical revelations. The film was embraced by black gay audiences for its authentic representation of style, and culture, as well its fierce response to oppression. It opened up opportunities for dialogue among and across communities. […Lees verder]

Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Poison

170423_poison_smSunday 23rd April 2017, Can Dialectics Break Bricks Cinema: Poison (1991), directed by Todd Haynes. 86 minutes. In English. Doors open at 20.30. At 21.00, screening.

The feature debut movie of the now famous Todd Haynes (Safe, Carol, Velvet Goldmine). When Haynes made this project he was still an obscure filmmaker mostly known only in the gay community. But when an American Senator named Jessie Helms publicly attacked the film it made the headlines and the flick was suddenly catapulted into art house cinemas and even won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival.

Poison was inspired by the transgressive writings of the French author Jean Genet, who was both a criminal and a poet. The narrative structure is quite experimental, reflecting the wildness in Haynes’ later biopic about Bob Dylan I’m not There. So instead of having a single storyline, it has three narrative paths… ‘Hero,’ ‘Horror’ and ‘Homo’, and each is depicted in a different style – color, black & white, and documentary. For example, ‘Horror’ is modelled after an old-fashioned sci-fi melodrama from the 50s, and is about a scientist who is able to distill the human sex-drive into a single fluid. When things go out of control it unleashes a sexual plague across mankind, a clear reference to the aids epidemic.

The imagery is dynamic and bold, the music score is great, and the end result is absolutely unique. But this is a film for people who want to explore, rather than have a comfortable viewing. For example, it doesn’t make it easy for the audience to know how to react to many scenes. It can shift from moments of intense beauty to visceral queasiness… almost to a dizzying degree. It can be both enchanting and provocative. This is a small indie gem that is almost forgotten today, but which still packs a punch after all these years. […Lees verder]